(Photo found here)
The strange-looking oarfish (Regalecus glesne) is the longest bony fish in  the sea. It is a member of the  Regalecidae family of fishes. The name Regalecidae is derived from the  latin word regalis, meaning “royal”. Because of its long, thin shape, the oarfish fish is  sometimes known as the ribbonfish. It is also commonly referred to as  the king of herrings. Even though it is a deep water species, it is not  too uncommon to see an oarfish. These unusual creatures have been known  to wash ashore on beaches after storms, providing endless hours of  fascination for curious onlookers. They also have a habit of floating  near the surface of the water when they are sick or dying. Because of  this, it is believed that the oarfish may be responsible for many of the  legendary sightings of sea monsters and sea serpents by ancient  mariners and beach goers. Although it is fished for sport as a game  fish, the oarfish is not usually fished commercially because its  gelatinous flesh is not considered edible. Oarfish feed primarily on zooplankton. Small fish, jellyfish and squid are also taken. Large open-ocean carnivores are all likely predators of oarfish, and include the Oceanic whitetip shark. One specimen of Regalecus glesne is listed in the Guinness Book of World Records as the longest bony fish alive, at  17 metres (56 ft) in length.
(Source)

(Photo found here)

The strange-looking oarfish (Regalecus glesne) is the longest bony fish in the sea. It is a member of the Regalecidae family of fishes. The name Regalecidae is derived from the latin word regalis, meaning “royal”. Because of its long, thin shape, the oarfish fish is sometimes known as the ribbonfish. It is also commonly referred to as the king of herrings. Even though it is a deep water species, it is not too uncommon to see an oarfish. These unusual creatures have been known to wash ashore on beaches after storms, providing endless hours of fascination for curious onlookers. They also have a habit of floating near the surface of the water when they are sick or dying. Because of this, it is believed that the oarfish may be responsible for many of the legendary sightings of sea monsters and sea serpents by ancient mariners and beach goers. Although it is fished for sport as a game fish, the oarfish is not usually fished commercially because its gelatinous flesh is not considered edible. Oarfish feed primarily on zooplankton. Small fish, jellyfish and squid are also taken. Large open-ocean carnivores are all likely predators of oarfish, and include the Oceanic whitetip shark. One specimen of Regalecus glesne is listed in the Guinness Book of World Records as the longest bony fish alive, at  17 metres (56 ft) in length.

(Source)

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