Posts tagged with blue...

Blue starfish (see this previous post)

Blue starfish (see this previous post)

letslook4treasure:

Roca Partida en las Islas Revillagigedo, México (Norbert Probst).

Manta rays (see this post)

letslook4treasure:

Roca Partida en las Islas Revillagigedo, México (Norbert Probst).

Manta rays (see this post)

(Photo found here) Christmas tree worms

(Photo found here) Christmas tree worms

sciencecenter:

This harlequin shrimp is mesmerizing
They sure are beautiful, but especially if you’re a starfish, these shrimp are not to be taken lightly. That’s because the shrimp feed on starfish, first stunning them with their front legs and then dragging them off to be eaten alive (so they stay fresh, of course). 

Harlequin shrimp, see this post

sciencecenter:

This harlequin shrimp is mesmerizing

They sure are beautiful, but especially if you’re a starfish, these shrimp are not to be taken lightly. That’s because the shrimp feed on starfish, first stunning them with their front legs and then dragging them off to be eaten alive (so they stay fresh, of course). 

Harlequin shrimp, see this post

(Photo by Aquatilis) 
Members of the phylum Ctenophora are known as sea-gooseberries or comb-jellies, and are startlingly beautiful marine invertebrates. They are commonly mistaken for jellyfish, but belong to their own group that is totaally unrelated to jellyfish. This sea-gooseberry (Pleurobrachia pileus) has a transparent spherical body bearing two feathery tentacles, which can be completely drawn back into special pouches. The name comb-jelly refers to the eight rows of hair-like cilia present on the body, which are known as comb-rows. The rhythmic beating of these cilia enables the animal to swim, and also refracts light, creating a multi-coloured shimmer.
(Source)

(Photo by Aquatilis

Members of the phylum Ctenophora are known as sea-gooseberries or comb-jellies, and are startlingly beautiful marine invertebrates. They are commonly mistaken for jellyfish, but belong to their own group that is totaally unrelated to jellyfish. This sea-gooseberry (Pleurobrachia pileus) has a transparent spherical body bearing two feathery tentacles, which can be completely drawn back into special pouches. The name comb-jelly refers to the eight rows of hair-like cilia present on the body, which are known as comb-rows. The rhythmic beating of these cilia enables the animal to swim, and also refracts light, creating a multi-coloured shimmer.

(Source)

opticoverload:Surrounded by Prey
Blacktip reef shark (see this post)

opticoverload:Surrounded by Prey

Blacktip reef shark (see this post)