Posts tagged with cephalopod...

100leaguesunderthesea:

by Reinhard Dirscherl

Wonderpus (see this previous post)

100leaguesunderthesea:

by Reinhard Dirscherl

Wonderpus (see this previous post)

rainbowslowpoke:

Bobtail Squids (aka Dumpling squids) are one of the smallest species of squid, ranging from 1 to 8 centimetres in length. They are closely related to Cuttlefish, although they do not possess a cuttlebone.
They are also one of the cutest animals to ever exist.

See these posts for more bobtail cuteness

rainbowslowpoke:

Bobtail Squids (aka Dumpling squids) are one of the smallest species of squid, ranging from 1 to 8 centimetres in length. They are closely related to Cuttlefish, although they do not possess a cuttlebone.

They are also one of the cutest animals to ever exist.

See these posts for more bobtail cuteness

cephalopodsgonewild:via diver.net
Caribbean reef octopus (see this post)

cephalopodsgonewild:via diver.net

Caribbean reef octopus (see this post)

(Photo by Richard Ling)
The Southern calamari squid (Sepioteuthis australis) presents color patterns that vary from orange-brown, to white with black bands, to almost transparent. They have diamond-shaped fins that extend the whole length of the body. They reach mantle lengths of up to 50cm. S. australis are reported to be voracious feeders that often approach divers at night to feed on the fish and crustaceans attracted to the lights. They are predominantly active at night, but can also be seen active during the day. They are very fast at jet propulsion, and excellent at catching fast fish and shrimp. They are found in Southern Australian coastal waters; from the southern end of the Great Barrier Reef around to Ningaloo Reef in Western Australia, and also in coastal waters of the North Island of New Zealand. They are common over reefs, sand and seagrass beds in shallow, inshore waters. 
(Source)

(Photo by Richard Ling)

The Southern calamari squid (Sepioteuthis australis) presents color patterns that vary from orange-brown, to white with black bands, to almost transparent. They have diamond-shaped fins that extend the whole length of the body. They reach mantle lengths of up to 50cm. S. australis are reported to be voracious feeders that often approach divers at night to feed on the fish and crustaceans attracted to the lights. They are predominantly active at night, but can also be seen active during the day. They are very fast at jet propulsion, and excellent at catching fast fish and shrimp. They are found in Southern Australian coastal waters; from the southern end of the Great Barrier Reef around to Ningaloo Reef in Western Australia, and also in coastal waters of the North Island of New Zealand. They are common over reefs, sand and seagrass beds in shallow, inshore waters. 

(Source)

(Photo by Chuck Gerlovich) Wonderpus (see this previous post)

(Photo by Chuck GerlovichWonderpus (see this previous post)

(Photo found here)
The googly-eyed glass squid (Teuthowenia pellucida) is a rare, slightly blue and transparent deep-sea squid. It gets its name from its disproportionately large eyes. It has eight short tentacles and one slightly longer pair. Its internal digestive organs and the females eggs can be visible through its transparent body. It is able to engorge itself with surrounding water to dramatically increase in size, portraying a more intimidating appearance to potential predators. Like most squid, it can also escape predators using jet propulsion. The cells of its eyes and tentacles form small light-emitting organs (bioluminescent photophores). This array of small lights is used to mask the true identity of the googly-eyed squid to others in the dark. For more on glass squid, see this post.
(Source)

(Photo found here)

The googly-eyed glass squid (Teuthowenia pellucida) is a rare, slightly blue and transparent deep-sea squid. It gets its name from its disproportionately large eyes. It has eight short tentacles and one slightly longer pair. Its internal digestive organs and the females eggs can be visible through its transparent body. It is able to engorge itself with surrounding water to dramatically increase in size, portraying a more intimidating appearance to potential predators. Like most squid, it can also escape predators using jet propulsion. The cells of its eyes and tentacles form small light-emitting organs (bioluminescent photophores). This array of small lights is used to mask the true identity of the googly-eyed squid to others in the dark. For more on glass squid, see this post.

(Source)

oceansoftheworld:

(Photo found here)
The reef cuttlefish or broadclub cuttlefish (Sepia latimanus) is the second largest cuttlefish species after Sepia apama, growing to 50 cm in mantle length and 10 kg in weight. Like many cephalopods, the broadclub can be seen displaying a range of colors and textures. Commonly they are light brown or yellowish with white mottled markings. Males are sometimes dark brown, particularly during courtship and mating. They mate in shallow water between January and May. Their eggs hatch in 38 to 40 days. During the breeding season, males establish a territory, defending a coral head where females lay eggs after mating. Courtship is highly ritualized and involves striking visual displays. Males often guard females to ward off other males.
(Source)
Birthday week re-post!

oceansoftheworld:

(Photo found here)

The reef cuttlefish or broadclub cuttlefish (Sepia latimanus) is the second largest cuttlefish species after Sepia apama, growing to 50 cm in mantle length and 10 kg in weight. Like many cephalopods, the broadclub can be seen displaying a range of colors and textures. Commonly they are light brown or yellowish with white mottled markings. Males are sometimes dark brown, particularly during courtship and mating. They mate in shallow water between January and May. Their eggs hatch in 38 to 40 days. During the breeding season, males establish a territory, defending a coral head where females lay eggs after mating. Courtship is highly ritualized and involves striking visual displays. Males often guard females to ward off other males.

(Source)

Birthday week re-post!

oceansoftheworld:

(Photo found here)
The vampire squid (Vampyroteuthis infernalis), looks like something that swam out of a late-night science fiction movie. But in spite of its monstrous name, its is a small creature, growing to only about 6 inches in length. The vampire squid is an ancient species and is a phylogenic relict, meaning that is is the only surviving member of the order Vampyromorphida. It is a unique member of the cephalopod family in that it shares similarities with both squid and octopuses. In fact, it was originally and mistakenly identified as an octopus by researchers in 1903.The vampire squid’s body is covered with light-producing organs called photophores. This gives the squid the unique ability to “turn itself on or off” at will through a chemical process known as bioluminescence. When the photophores are off, the squid is completely invisible in the dark waters where it lives. The squid has incredible control over these light organs. It has the ability to modulate the size and intensity of the photophores to create complex patterns that can be used to disorient predators and attract prey. Vampire squid are found throughout the deep oceans of the world in most tropical and temperate regions at depths of between 300 feet (about 90 meters) and 3,000 feet (over 900 meters).
(Source)
Birthday week re-post!

oceansoftheworld:

(Photo found here)

The vampire squid (Vampyroteuthis infernalis), looks like something that swam out of a late-night science fiction movie. But in spite of its monstrous name, its is a small creature, growing to only about 6 inches in length. The vampire squid is an ancient species and is a phylogenic relict, meaning that is is the only surviving member of the order Vampyromorphida. It is a unique member of the cephalopod family in that it shares similarities with both squid and octopuses. In fact, it was originally and mistakenly identified as an octopus by researchers in 1903.The vampire squid’s body is covered with light-producing organs called photophores. This gives the squid the unique ability to “turn itself on or off” at will through a chemical process known as bioluminescence. When the photophores are off, the squid is completely invisible in the dark waters where it lives. The squid has incredible control over these light organs. It has the ability to modulate the size and intensity of the photophores to create complex patterns that can be used to disorient predators and attract prey. Vampire squid are found throughout the deep oceans of the world in most tropical and temperate regions at depths of between 300 feet (about 90 meters) and 3,000 feet (over 900 meters).

(Source)

Birthday week re-post!

oceansoftheworld:

(Photo found here)
This is a Hawaiian bobtail squid (Euprymna scolopes); a species of bobtail squid (see this previous post) in the family Sepiolidae. It is native to the central Pacific Ocean, where it occurs in shallow coastal waters off the Hawaiin Islands.
(Source)
Birthday week re-post!

oceansoftheworld:

(Photo found here)

This is a Hawaiian bobtail squid (Euprymna scolopes); a species of bobtail squid (see this previous post) in the family Sepiolidae. It is native to the central Pacific Ocean, where it occurs in shallow coastal waters off the Hawaiin Islands.

(Source)

Birthday week re-post!

oceansoftheworld:

(photo by David Shale)
This is a juvenile glass squid in the family Cranchiidae, which comprises approximately 60 species, also known as cranchiid or cranch squid. Cranchiid squid occur in surface and midwater depths of open oceans around the world. Like most squid, the juveniles of cranchiid squid live in surface waters, descending to deeper waters as they mature. The body shape of many species changes drastically between growth stages and many young examples could be confused for different species altogether. The common name, glass squid, derives from the transparent nature of most species. Squid are cephalopods (see these previous posts for more information).
(Source)
Birthday week re-post!

oceansoftheworld:

(photo by David Shale)

This is a juvenile glass squid in the family Cranchiidae, which comprises approximately 60 species, also known as cranchiid or cranch squid. Cranchiid squid occur in surface and midwater depths of open oceans around the world. Like most squid, the juveniles of cranchiid squid live in surface waters, descending to deeper waters as they mature. The body shape of many species changes drastically between growth stages and many young examples could be confused for different species altogether. The common name, glass squid, derives from the transparent nature of most species. Squid are cephalopods (see these previous posts for more information).

(Source)

Birthday week re-post!