Posts tagged with cephalopod...

100leaguesunderthesea:

by Reinhard Dirscherl

Wonderpus (see this previous post)

100leaguesunderthesea:

by Reinhard Dirscherl

Wonderpus (see this previous post)

rainbowslowpoke:

Bobtail Squids (aka Dumpling squids) are one of the smallest species of squid, ranging from 1 to 8 centimetres in length. They are closely related to Cuttlefish, although they do not possess a cuttlebone.
They are also one of the cutest animals to ever exist.

See these posts for more bobtail cuteness

rainbowslowpoke:

Bobtail Squids (aka Dumpling squids) are one of the smallest species of squid, ranging from 1 to 8 centimetres in length. They are closely related to Cuttlefish, although they do not possess a cuttlebone.

They are also one of the cutest animals to ever exist.

See these posts for more bobtail cuteness

cephalopodsgonewild:via diver.net
Caribbean reef octopus (see this post)

cephalopodsgonewild:via diver.net

Caribbean reef octopus (see this post)

(Photo by Richard Ling)
The Southern calamari squid (Sepioteuthis australis) presents color patterns that vary from orange-brown, to white with black bands, to almost transparent. They have diamond-shaped fins that extend the whole length of the body. They reach mantle lengths of up to 50cm. S. australis are reported to be voracious feeders that often approach divers at night to feed on the fish and crustaceans attracted to the lights. They are predominantly active at night, but can also be seen active during the day. They are very fast at jet propulsion, and excellent at catching fast fish and shrimp. They are found in Southern Australian coastal waters; from the southern end of the Great Barrier Reef around to Ningaloo Reef in Western Australia, and also in coastal waters of the North Island of New Zealand. They are common over reefs, sand and seagrass beds in shallow, inshore waters. 
(Source)

(Photo by Richard Ling)

The Southern calamari squid (Sepioteuthis australis) presents color patterns that vary from orange-brown, to white with black bands, to almost transparent. They have diamond-shaped fins that extend the whole length of the body. They reach mantle lengths of up to 50cm. S. australis are reported to be voracious feeders that often approach divers at night to feed on the fish and crustaceans attracted to the lights. They are predominantly active at night, but can also be seen active during the day. They are very fast at jet propulsion, and excellent at catching fast fish and shrimp. They are found in Southern Australian coastal waters; from the southern end of the Great Barrier Reef around to Ningaloo Reef in Western Australia, and also in coastal waters of the North Island of New Zealand. They are common over reefs, sand and seagrass beds in shallow, inshore waters. 

(Source)

(Photo by Chuck Gerlovich) Wonderpus (see this previous post)

(Photo by Chuck GerlovichWonderpus (see this previous post)

(Photo found here)
The googly-eyed glass squid (Teuthowenia pellucida) is a rare, slightly blue and transparent deep-sea squid. It gets its name from its disproportionately large eyes. It has eight short tentacles and one slightly longer pair. Its internal digestive organs and the females eggs can be visible through its transparent body. It is able to engorge itself with surrounding water to dramatically increase in size, portraying a more intimidating appearance to potential predators. Like most squid, it can also escape predators using jet propulsion. The cells of its eyes and tentacles form small light-emitting organs (bioluminescent photophores). This array of small lights is used to mask the true identity of the googly-eyed squid to others in the dark. For more on glass squid, see this post.
(Source)

(Photo found here)

The googly-eyed glass squid (Teuthowenia pellucida) is a rare, slightly blue and transparent deep-sea squid. It gets its name from its disproportionately large eyes. It has eight short tentacles and one slightly longer pair. Its internal digestive organs and the females eggs can be visible through its transparent body. It is able to engorge itself with surrounding water to dramatically increase in size, portraying a more intimidating appearance to potential predators. Like most squid, it can also escape predators using jet propulsion. The cells of its eyes and tentacles form small light-emitting organs (bioluminescent photophores). This array of small lights is used to mask the true identity of the googly-eyed squid to others in the dark. For more on glass squid, see this post.

(Source)