Posts tagged with fishes...

(Photo by Alan James)
Basking sharks (Cetorhinus maximus) are  recognized by their huge sizes, conical snouts,  extremely large gill slits, and dark bristle-like gill rakers inside the  gills (present most of the year). Basking sharks are the second largest fish, only surpassed by the whale shark. Their  average size is 6.7-8.8m. The largest measured basking shark was 9.75m, and a 9.14m long individual was recorded that weighed 3,900kg. There are also unconfirmed reports of basking sharks up to 13.7m long. The basking shark can open its cavernous mouth up to 1.2m wide, allowing water to pass over the gill rakers, which strain  small fishes and invertebrates out of the water. They are often seen  feeding near the surface. Basking shark populations have been declining since the 1970s; they  never fully recovered from the large scale commercial fisheries of the  1950s and remain over-fished in the North Atlantic. Though you might want to steer clear of its mouth, the basking shark is not considered dangerous.
(Source)

(Photo by Alan James)

Basking sharks (Cetorhinus maximus) are recognized by their huge sizes, conical snouts, extremely large gill slits, and dark bristle-like gill rakers inside the gills (present most of the year). Basking sharks are the second largest fish, only surpassed by the whale shark. Their average size is 6.7-8.8m. The largest measured basking shark was 9.75m, and a 9.14m long individual was recorded that weighed 3,900kg. There are also unconfirmed reports of basking sharks up to 13.7m long. The basking shark can open its cavernous mouth up to 1.2m wide, allowing water to pass over the gill rakers, which strain small fishes and invertebrates out of the water. They are often seen feeding near the surface. Basking shark populations have been declining since the 1970s; they never fully recovered from the large scale commercial fisheries of the 1950s and remain over-fished in the North Atlantic. Though you might want to steer clear of its mouth, the basking shark is not considered dangerous.

(Source)

(Source)
The Blue damselfish (Chrysiptera cyanea), also known as sapphire devil, or orangetail blue damselfish, is a popular saltwater aquarium fish from the Indo-Pacific.  It is estimated to be the most sold marine aquarium fish in the United  States. It grows to a size of 8.5 cm in length. 

(Source)

The Blue damselfish (Chrysiptera cyanea), also known as sapphire devil, or orangetail blue damselfish, is a popular saltwater aquarium fish from the Indo-Pacific. It is estimated to be the most sold marine aquarium fish in the United States. It grows to a size of 8.5 cm in length. 

(Photo found here)
The Greenland shark (Somniosus microcephalus) is mainly a cold water animal. It is present in the North Atlantic Ocean in polar latitudes, but may occasionally be found further south in the Gulf of Maine, or rarely, as far south as the Gulf of Mexico. It has sometimes been caught near the mouths of rivers (Saguenay river in Quebec). It is often caught by Canadian fishermen fishing for halibut and other deep-water species.This shark species inhabits arctic and subarctic waters where the water temperature is between -2 and 7 degrees Celsius. It is the only species found regularly in these cold waters. It is a deep dwelling shark commonly found at depths greater than 200 meters, except when it comes to the surface during the cooler winter months. During the summer the Greenland shark inhabits depths of 180 to 730 meters (600 to 2400 feet). In the winter, it can be found near the surface and near the edge of ice flows. Given their icy habitat, it should come as little surprise that  Greenland sharks are relatively sluggish creatures. It is thought that  the sharks are either ambush predators or scavengers. Examination of the shark’s  stomach has shown that the animals eat bottom-dwelling species of fish, invertebrates, and marine mammals  such as seals. On rare occasion, the sharks have been known to eat polar  bear, dog, reindeer, and caribou.The flesh of a Greenland shark is poisonous. This is due to the presence of the toxin trimethylamine oxide, which, upon digestion, breaks down into trimethylamine, producing effects similar to extreme drunkenness. Similar toxic effects occur with the related Pacific sleeper shark, but not in most other shark species, whose meat is often consumed fresh. Although contact with humans is rare, these sharks are considered dangerous due to their size. They can reach lengths of 24 feet.
(Source)

(Photo found here)

The Greenland shark (Somniosus microcephalusis mainly a cold water animal. It is present in the North Atlantic Ocean in polar latitudes, but may occasionally be found further south in the Gulf of Maine, or rarely, as far south as the Gulf of Mexico. It has sometimes been caught near the mouths of rivers (Saguenay river in Quebec). It is often caught by Canadian fishermen fishing for halibut and other deep-water species.This shark species inhabits arctic and subarctic waters where the water temperature is between -2 and 7 degrees Celsius. It is the only species found regularly in these cold waters. It is a deep dwelling shark commonly found at depths greater than 200 meters, except when it comes to the surface during the cooler winter months. During the summer the Greenland shark inhabits depths of 180 to 730 meters (600 to 2400 feet). In the winter, it can be found near the surface and near the edge of ice flows. Given their icy habitat, it should come as little surprise that Greenland sharks are relatively sluggish creatures. It is thought that the sharks are either ambush predators or scavengers. Examination of the shark’s stomach has shown that the animals eat bottom-dwelling species of fish, invertebrates, and marine mammals such as seals. On rare occasion, the sharks have been known to eat polar bear, dog, reindeer, and caribou.The flesh of a Greenland shark is poisonous. This is due to the presence of the toxin trimethylamine oxide, which, upon digestion, breaks down into trimethylamine, producing effects similar to extreme drunkenness. Similar toxic effects occur with the related Pacific sleeper shark, but not in most other shark species, whose meat is often consumed fresh. Although contact with humans is rare, these sharks are considered dangerous due to their size. They can reach lengths of 24 feet.

(Source)

fuckyeahaquaria:Coral Grouper (by Fish.Eye)
Coral trout (see this previous post)

fuckyeahaquaria:Coral Grouper (by Fish.Eye)

Coral trout (see this previous post)

theanimalblog:(via Smashing Picture)
Whale shark (see this previous post)

theanimalblog:(via Smashing Picture)

Whale shark (see this previous post)

(Photo by Shane Gross)
whale shark (see this previous post)

(Photo by Shane Gross)

whale shark (see this previous post)