Posts tagged with marine biology...

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The Galapagos catshark (Bythaelurus giddingsi) is a species of catshark from the Galapagos Islands. The species was first discovered in 1995, and formally described in 2012. The Galapagos catshark is about a foot long, and it is colored brown with light spots. The Galapagos catshark is brown on top with light spots arranged in an asymmetric pattern. Other species of catshark either lack spots, or else have a spots arranged in a single line (Info).

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The Galapagos catshark (Bythaelurus giddingsi) is a species of catshark from the Galapagos Islands. The species was first discovered in 1995, and formally described in 2012. The Galapagos catshark is about a foot long, and it is colored brown with light spots. The Galapagos catshark is brown on top with light spots arranged in an asymmetric pattern. Other species of catshark either lack spots, or else have a spots arranged in a single line (Info).

the-shark-blog:

The earliest sharks date from more than 420 million years ago, before the time of the dinosaurs! The 400 species of modern sharks have evolved in various ways and scientists have classified them into the 8 major groups shown in this graphic. See how sharks fit into this family tree, from the most well-known sharks like the great white and tiger sharks, to the bizarre lesser-known sharks like the frilled shark, goblin shark and cookiecutter shark.”

Joseph // Source

Two-Headed Dolphin Is Super Rare →

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Marine Snow-Until about 130 years ago, scholars believed that no life could exist in the deep ocean. The abyss was simply too dark and cold to sustain life. The discovery of many animals living in the abyssal environment stunned the late 19th century scientific community. Major questions immediately emerged: How do deep sea animals obtain food so far from the ocean’s surface where plants, the base of the ecosystem, grow? Soon after World War II, scientists at Hokkaido University built an early submersible, named Kuroshio, to dive in the ocean north of Japan. Wherever they beamed a search light, they saw “snowflakes” dancing from the disturbance caused by the submersible. K. Kato and N. Suzuki named this phenomenon “marine snow.” 

Marine snow is a continous shower of organic detritus that falls from the sunlit upper layers into the deep ocean. It consists of dead or dying animals and plants, fecal matter, and inorganic dust, clumped together in loose flocs. In the deep ocean it is consumed by a variety of animals or decomposes. Many marine snow “flakes” are sticky and fibrous like a crumbled spider net, and particles easily adhere to them, forming agregates. An aggregate begins to sink when it attracts fecal pellets, foraminifera tests, airborne dust, and other heavier particles. As it descends, more suspended particles are added, making the aggregate even heavier and thus faster moving. 

Marine snow is a significant energy source and a mechanism for transporting carbon into the deep ocean (known as the biological carbon pump), allowing for life in the deep. 

 

simmerdown:

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SHARKS ARE IMPORTANT, GUYS!

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The Indian glassy fish (Parambassis ranga), is a species of freshwater fish in the Asiatic glassfish family (Ambassidae) of order Perciformes (see this post). It is native to an area of south Asia from Pakistan to Malaysia. The Indian glassy fish has a striking transparent body revealing its bones and internal organs; the male develops a dark edge to the dorsal fin. The fish grows to a maximum overall length of 80 millimeters (3.1 in). It occurs in standing water, especially in impoundments, and it breeds prolifically during the rainy season. The Indian glassy fish is not important as a food fish for humans, but is very common in the aquarium trade. Formerly classified as Chanda ranga, the species is also known as the Indian glassfish, Indian glass perch, and Siamese glassfish. Indian glassy fish sold to hobbyists have often been “painted”, which involves injecting colored dye into the fish’s transparent tissue to make them more attractive to hobbyists. These colored fish are often called “disco fish”(see this post).
(Source)

(Photo found here)

The Indian glassy fish (Parambassis ranga), is a species of freshwater fish in the Asiatic glassfish family (Ambassidae) of order Perciformes (see this post). It is native to an area of south Asia from Pakistan to Malaysia. The Indian glassy fish has a striking transparent body revealing its bones and internal organs; the male develops a dark edge to the dorsal fin. The fish grows to a maximum overall length of 80 millimeters (3.1 in). It occurs in standing water, especially in impoundments, and it breeds prolifically during the rainy season. The Indian glassy fish is not important as a food fish for humans, but is very common in the aquarium trade. Formerly classified as Chanda ranga, the species is also known as the Indian glassfish, Indian glass perch, and Siamese glassfish. Indian glassy fish sold to hobbyists have often been “painted”, which involves injecting colored dye into the fish’s transparent tissue to make them more attractive to hobbyists. These colored fish are often called “disco fish”(see this post).

(Source)