Posts tagged with octopus...

lightningblitz6:daysofxavierspast:zeelaonmars:scalestails:
Octopus

lightningblitz6:daysofxavierspast:zeelaonmars:scalestails:

Octopus

(Source: 4gifs)

100leaguesunderthesea:

by Reinhard Dirscherl

Wonderpus (see this previous post)

100leaguesunderthesea:

by Reinhard Dirscherl

Wonderpus (see this previous post)

cephalopodsgonewild:via diver.net
Caribbean reef octopus (see this post)

cephalopodsgonewild:via diver.net

Caribbean reef octopus (see this post)

(Photo by Chuck Gerlovich) Wonderpus (see this previous post)

(Photo by Chuck GerlovichWonderpus (see this previous post)

fyeah-seacreatures:Coconut Octopus. By: Luko Gecko
Coconut octopus

fyeah-seacreatures:Coconut Octopus. By: Luko Gecko

Coconut octopus

The mimic octopus (Thaumoctopus mimicus), is a species of octopus that has a strong ability to mimic other creatures. It grows up to 60 cm (2 feet) in length. Its normal coloring consists of brown and white stripes or spots. It lives in the tropical seas of Southeast Asia on the bottom of muddy rivers and estuaries. The species was not discovered officially until 1998, off the coast of Sulawesi in Indonesia. For the next 2 years, scientists filmed nine different mimic octopuses impersonating sea snakes, lionfish, and flatfish—a strategy used to avoid predators. All octopus species are highly intelligent and change the color and texture of their skin for camouflage to avoid predators. Until the mimic octopus was discovered, however, the remarkable ability to impersonate another animal had never been observed.
(Source)

The mimic octopus (Thaumoctopus mimicus), is a species of octopus that has a strong ability to mimic other creatures. It grows up to 60 cm (2 feet) in length. Its normal coloring consists of brown and white stripes or spots. It lives in the tropical seas of Southeast Asia on the bottom of muddy rivers and estuaries. The species was not discovered officially until 1998, off the coast of Sulawesi in Indonesia. For the next 2 years, scientists filmed nine different mimic octopuses impersonating sea snakes, lionfish, and flatfish—a strategy used to avoid predators. All octopus species are highly intelligent and change the color and texture of their skin for camouflage to avoid predators. Until the mimic octopus was discovered, however, the remarkable ability to impersonate another animal had never been observed.

(Source)

fuckyeahaquaria: Blue Ring Octopus | Hapalochlaena maculosa (by Saspotato)
Blue ringed octopus (see this post)

fuckyeahaquariaBlue Ring Octopus | Hapalochlaena maculosa (by Saspotato)

Blue ringed octopus (see this post)

(Photo by Dmitry Miroshnikov) Wonderpus (see this previous post)

(Photo by Dmitry Miroshnikov) Wonderpus (see this previous post)

(Photo found here)
Scientists doing their first exploring of deep-sea vents in the  Antarctic have uncovered a  world unlike anything found around other  hydrothermal vents, one populated by new species of anemones, predatory  sea stars, and piles of hairy-chested yeti crabs. It was "almost like a sight from another planet," said expedition  leader Alex Rogers, a professor of zoology at Oxford University. One of the rarest finds the team encountered was this 2’ long (0.6m) ghost pale octopus or ghostly octopus. The team isn’t sure what the octopus eats, but they did manage to film the  animals walking around on the sea floor in a weird fashion. Researchers said that the back four tentacles sort of shuffle, while the front four feel in front of the octopus. ”We weren’t able to collect any specimens—they were quick and rare—but they’re quite possibly a new species.” Read more here.

(Photo found here)

Scientists doing their first exploring of deep-sea vents in the Antarctic have uncovered a  world unlike anything found around other hydrothermal vents, one populated by new species of anemones, predatory sea stars, and piles of hairy-chested yeti crabs. It was "almost like a sight from another planet," said expedition leader Alex Rogers, a professor of zoology at Oxford University. One of the rarest finds the team encountered was this 2’ long (0.6m) ghost pale octopus or ghostly octopus. The team isn’t sure what the octopus eats, but they did manage to film the animals walking around on the sea floor in a weird fashion. Researchers said that the back four tentacles sort of shuffle, while the front four feel in front of the octopus. ”We weren’t able to collect any specimens—they were quick and rare—but they’re quite possibly a new species.” Read more here.

(Photo by Mark Laita) North Pacific Giant Octopus (see this previous post for more)

(Photo by Mark Laita) North Pacific Giant Octopus (see this previous post for more)